By Daniel Etchells

Roman Kreuziger has been cleared of any anti-doping violations by the Czech Olympic Committee ©Getty ImagesRoman Kreuziger has been cleared of any anti-doping violations by the Czech Olympic Committee (CAC), despite provisionally being suspended by the International Cycling Union (UCI) after registering anomalies in his blood passport earlier this season.

Kreuziger was asked by the UCI in May to provide an explanation for the anomalies, which relate to values from 2011 and 2012 when he was riding with Astana, but was allowed to continue racing.

Although he was never suspended by his team Tinkoff-Saxo, they decided to pull him out of their Tour de France squad to avoid the inevitable media attention that his participation would attract.

The 28-year-old was set to make a return to racing at the Tour de Pologne in August but the UCI decided to ban him provisionally pending the CAC's ruling.

"The Commission took into account the fact that the values of the Athlete Biological Passport do not exceed the so-called basal [extreme] values, taking into account expert opinions submitted by the International Cycling Union and the athlete in question, who explained the abnormality," said the CAC in a statement.

"In view of the fact that the conclusions of expert reports submitted by the athlete, and by the International Cycling Union regarding the alleged abnormalities in the Athlete Biological Passport, which contradicted the athlete and provided the Commission with an explanation of the alleged abnormalities, the Commission concludes that in the case, Roman Kreuziger is not in violation of anti-doping regulations."

Roman Kreuzigers team, Tinkoff-Saxo, decided to pull him out of this year's Tour de France ©Getty ImagesRoman Kreuziger's team, Tinkoff-Saxo, decided to pull him out of this year's Tour de France ©Getty Images






If the UCI or the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) choose to appeal the decision, they have one month to do so.

"The International Cycling Union confirms receipt of the Arbitration Committee of the Czech Olympic Committee's decision on the Roman Kreuziger case," said the UCI in a statement. 

"The UCI takes note of the decision to acquit the rider and will consider the possibility of appealing the decision to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, as provided under the UCI Anti-Doping Rules.

"At this stage, with the relevant appeal windows opened, the UCI will not make any further comment on the case."

When contacted by insidethegames regarding the matter, a WADA spokesman stated they must wait to receive the decision from the CAC and make a request for the full case file before deciding whether or not to file an appeal.

Contact the writer of this story at daniel[email protected]


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