Paris 2024 chief executive Etienne Thobois revealed he is "looking carefully" at the simplification measures for Tokyo 2020 ©Getty Images

Paris 2024 chief executive Etienne Thobois has said he is "looking carefully" at the simplification measures set to be put in place for next year's Olympic and Paralympic in Tokyo.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) and Tokyo 2020 approved 50 measures last week to reduce the cost of the Games, including those relating to the number of people involved, infrastructure and Ceremonies.

These efforts have been labelled the "Tokyo model" by the IOC, with Coordination Commission chair John Coates claiming the measures will aid future organisers.

"We are looking very carefully at those measures, plus I was actually listening, invited by the IOC and Tokyo 2020, to those various simplification measures," said Thobois.

"We are in a working group with the IOC and other Organising Committees, including Milan, Tokyo, Los Angeles, where the IOC keeps us very much involved in the discussion and information.

"And definitely, those measures we follow very carefully, as they will potentially save costs and become the new norm, they could become the new standard for delivering the Games.

"We are very careful and looking through what is decided there to see how we can implement it to our future Games."

The International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 approved 50 simplification measures for next year's Olympic and Paralympic Games ©Getty Images
The International Olympic Committee and Tokyo 2020 approved 50 simplification measures for next year's Olympic and Paralympic Games ©Getty Images

Measures introduced for Tokyo 2020 include the reduction of officials attending the Games by 10 to 15 per cent, streamlining of transport services, adjusting spectator activities at competition venues and hosting a number of pre-Games meetings online.

Team welcome ceremonies for the Games, which have traditionally been held at the Athletes’ Village prior to the Opening Ceremony, have also been scrapped.

Such cost-cutting measures are necessary due to the postponement of Tokyo 2020 to 2021 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The economic impact of the global health crisis has also seen Paris 2024 approve plans to scrap temporary swimming and volleyball venues.

Swimming, which was due to take place in front of the Stade de France in Seine-Saint-Denis, will now be staged in a temporary pool within the La Défense Arena, also the proposed venue for gymnastics. 

Volleyball is expected to be moved from Le Bourget to Stade Pierre-Mauroy in Villeneuve-d'Ascq, the home of Ligue 1 side LOSC Lille.

Climbing and rugby sevens are due to move to facilities in Seine-Saint-Denis, while the number of football stadiums has been reduced from eight to seven. 

The updated Paris 2024 venue plan will be put to the International Olympic Committee Executive Board during its meeting in December.

Volleyball events at Paris 2024 is now set to take place at Stade Pierre-Mauroy in Villeneuve-d'Ascq ©Wikipedia
Volleyball events at Paris 2024 is now set to take place at Stade Pierre-Mauroy in Villeneuve-d'Ascq ©Wikipedia

Changes were made as part of a concept review, which Paris 2024 claim is necessary to ensure the Games can be organised within budget, particularly due to the economic uncertainty caused by the pandemic.

Organisers said they wanted to optimise the existing concept by pooling sites for several sports and ultimately reduce the number, while keeping a strong foothold in Seine-Saint-Denis. 

Paris 2024 received an economic boost. however, when global telecommunications company Orange signed on as the third premium partner of the Games. 

Thibois said the deal meant Paris 2024 had reached half of its planned €1.1 billion (£1 billion/€1.3 billion) budget, and suggested more agreements may be reached before the end of the year. 

"All together that means we are now around half of the target reached," he said.

"It is obviously a great step moving forward and we will come back to you at the end of the year with other good news.

"So, things are moving on.

"Obviously the overall situation is difficult for companies.

"We need to make sure that we understand that, but on the other hand, we still have contact will all the companies we were discussing with before the pandemic, and I think we can feel there is a positive feeling around the project."