By Nick Butler in Montreux

Thomas Bach announced that 40 recommendations will be made as part of Olympic Agenda 2020 ©AFP/Getty ImagesInternational Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach has revealed 40 recommendations will be made as part of Olympic Agenda 2020, although changing current rules banning member visits to bidding cities is not one of them. 


All 40 recommendations will be voted upon by the membership during the IOC Extraordinary Session in Monte Carlo on December 8 and 9, Bach revealed following the conclusion of the IOC Executive Board meeting here this afternoon.

Some will be subject to a simple majority, while others will require a two-thirds one, depending on whether changes to the IOC Charter are required.

The recommendations concern the three broad issues of sustainability, credibility and youth, with the full list expected to be distributed to the members, and announced to the public, in the middle of November.

Thomas Bach and the rest of the IOC Executive Board pose following the conclusion of the two-day meeting in Montreux, where the recommendations were drawn up ©IOC/Christophe MoratalThomas Bach and the rest of the IOC Executive Board pose following the conclusion of the two-day meeting in Montreux, where the recommendations were drawn up
©IOC/Christophe Moratal



Although he avoided being too specific on most aspects, Bach did confirm there will be no recommendation for a change to the ban on host city visits, introduced in 1998 by former IOC President Juan Antonio Samaranch in the aftermath of the Salt Lake City bribery scandal. 

A shift towards "invitation, discussion and partnership" between bid cities and the IOC is being pursued, in contrast with the more rigid current system, with reducing the cost of bidding and making requirements clearer to cities two key requirements. 

When asked to clarify this, Bach replied that, while cities will not be "invited" to bid, it will be far more a "dialogue" than previously, where applicants will be encouraged to submit a bid that best fits their social, sporting, economical and ecological positions, rather than simply fulfil a general and concrete set of requirements. 

A fragmented 2022 Olympic race, further scarred by the withdrawal of Oslo last month, has made the bidding process a crucial part of Agenda 2020 ©AFP/Getty ImagesA fragmented 2022 Olympic race, further scarred by the withdrawal of Oslo last month, has made the bidding process a crucial part of Agenda 2020 ©AFP/Getty Images





No change is expected, however, to the current seven year timetable for cities to organise Games following their selection, with Bach describing the current timetable as "successful and appropriate".

Another key aspect of the year-long reform process concerns changes to the sports programme but, despite several questions on the topic, Bach did not reveal specific recommendations beyond an attempt to increase flexibility while also ensuring they sustain sustainability.

Although the programme has been fixed for Tokyo 2020, changes can still be made providing the Organising Committee approves the plans, meaning that the door remains open for baseball and softball to be included, something widely muted over recent months. 

Another idea that will go ahead is the Olympic TV channel, it was revealed, following a broader feasibility study over how it would work and a time-frame for its introduction. 

The recommendation put forward to the IOC Session concerns simply whether it will go ahead, with more details and plans to be discussed next year, providing the motion is passed.

Bach added that "putting such a worldwide channel into operation will not happen in a couple of months", but they will "work diligently to make a decision at speed", if and when approval is given.

Key Olympic Agenda 2020 decisions were made during the IOC Executive Board in the lakeside town of Montreux ©AFP/Getty ImagesKey Olympic Agenda 2020 decisions were made during the IOC Executive Board in the lakeside town of Montreux ©AFP/Getty Images



Since being initiated last December, Olympic Agenda 2020 has also been debated by the IOC Commissions and at two Olympic Summits, as well as at the IOC Session in Sochi in February, with a total of 1,200 ideas from 270 direct contributions having been voiced.

Earlier this year, 14 Working Groups were established to refine the recommendations, with experts from civil society, including the United Nations, Google, YouTube, and the World Bank participating alongside representatives from the Olympic Movement.

Submissions from these Groups were presented to the Executive Board over the last two days.

On a general note, Bach described how the Board meeting - taking place here in Montreux, 30 kilometres to the west of Lausanne along Lake Geneva - had been "excellent", "fruitful" and "very constructive", as shown by the fact they had finished a day earlier than planned. 

Agenda 2020 was described as the "core of the discussions", although other issues were discussed, including the granting of provisional recognition to Kosovo and a decision not to suspend Gambia from the IOC. 

A wider aim to give athletes a better voice within the IOC, while ensuring even greater transparency over finances, was also highlighted. 

Contact the writer of this story at [email protected]sidethegames.biz


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